Year: 2018

Pet Door, Cat Door

Ways to Keep Your Cat from Escaping Outside This Summer

1. Home Environment
When cats are busy and entertained, they’re less likely to seek adventure elsewhere. Offering a variety of brain-stimulating activities and toys makes this easier. There are a host of treat puzzles and interactive toys on the market. Read reviews and take your cat’s play habits into consideration before making a purchase.
2. Teach your cat to come when called
It’s true – cats can learn tricks and commands, especially if (surprise!) treats are involved. Consistently teaching your kitty to come when you call his name – and then rewarding him with a treat – makes life a whole lot easier when you’re attempting an exit without a cat on your heels. While kitty is busy gobbling his treats, slip through the door, all sneaky-like.
3. Cat Attention At The Door
If you show your cat oodles of attention as you enter and exit your home, he’ll associate your home’s entryway with attention. This association keeps kitty focusing on that location when you’re coming or going. Needless to say, the likelihood of escaping escalates when this happens. It’s best to greet your cat in an area away from the door. Cats are smart and will catch on!
4. Gestures spot away from the door
Create a space away from the doorway that becomes the special hello/goodbye location for you and your cat. Maybe it’s on a ledge of a cat tree or in another room altogether. Offer a treat when kitty meets you at the spot. Once again, make your great escape during treat-nomming.
5. Post a note by the door to warn visitors
If you’re expecting company, place a warning note so your friends and family keep potentially fleeing felines in mind when arriving or exiting through a door to the outside.

6. Close your cat in a door when join together
Whether you’re welcoming guests for summer entertaining or you’ve got repair or delivery professionals stopping by, “stranger danger” (plus loud noises and chaos!) freaks cats out. Nip the stressful situation in the bud and place your cat behind closed doors with food, water, a litter box and toys to keep him comfortable and entertained. As another precautionary measure, post a note on the outside of the door reminding everyone there’s a kitty in the room.
7. Make sure windows have sturdy screens
If you open your windows during warm weather, make sure the screens are tightly secured so kitty doesn’t swat at a fly and take a fall from the window.
Even after taking detailed precautions, it’s possible that kitty may still find himself outdoors. It’s not a pleasant thought, but here’s how to make sure your cat is as safe as possible should he make the great escape:
• Make sure your cat is micro-chipped and wearing a collar and tag.
• Keep your cat’s shots up-to-date.
• Make sure your kitties are spayed or neutered.
Summer is full of fun and relaxation, which is exponentially enhanced when we know our indoor kitties are safe and sound.

5 Myths About Pet Doors: Exposed

Pet Doors are a great way to have a happy and healthy pup. There are so many options, how does anyone choose? The first step is separating facts from fiction. Pet Door experts have come together to tackle the top 10 pet doors myths!

#1 Myth: All Flaps are Made Equal
Not true! Pet doors are conceptually similar, but different pet doors are designed for specific purposes. Factors that determine how a flap is made include climate, electronic preferences, and economical choice.
Weather proof flaps tend to be slightly heavier than the average flap, with additional magnets to keep insulation value high. With electronic pet doors, flaps are made of acrylic plastic. These flaps are sized for small dogs and cats. Automatic pet doors that open upon reading a collar key signal, have flaps made of plexiglass and for larger pets. Be sure to prioritize your needs along with that of your pet so you both are happy.

#2 Myth: Breeds Have a Standard Size
Not true! Measuring your pet is necessary for all breeds. Although your pet may seem average for their breed, you should still bring out the tape measure!
It is important to make sure your furry friend will fit through their door since they will using it every day. It is recommended to measure your pet from feet to shoulder, and have the top of the pet door flap installed at least one inch above their back to ensure a comfortable pass.
With this in mind, check the flap width too, so your pet does not get stuck. A good homemade trick is to cut a hole in cardboard to act as a guide. An additional item to consider is the step over. This is the space between the ground and your pet door. The step over needs to be taken into account when you are choosing a flap size.

#3 Myth: Pet Doors are Made Only for Doors
Not true! As every pet is different, so is every home. Doors for pets are now made to be installed in a variety of places within the house. Besides doors and walls, pet doors can be installed in windows, screens, the cabinet where the litter box hides, storm doors, and even closets! As there are many hang out spots in the house, there are just as many doors to fit your pup’s lifestyle. Options for sliding glass doors and windows are wonderful if you are renting your home and you can’t actually cut any holes anywhere!

#4 Myth: Adults Crawl through Pet Doors to get Inside
Possibly… If you worry about security, even having a back door with dog door can be a tough decision to make. While electronic doors can act as a solution for this potential issue, wearing a collar key might not be an ideal situation for you or your pet. A pet door may only be big enough for the average person to pop their head in without a locking cover. That person also runs the risk of meeting your protective pup! Intruders would likely fear a home with a large pet door, as they don’t know how friendly the dog on the other side might be. If you are worried about break-ins while you and your dog are away, you can also invest in an additional security cover for your pet door.
While pet doors halt the average adult from entering the house, there have been instances where children forget their house key and are able to crawl through. On the other hand, electronic doors are also a great way to keep babies or small children from getting stuck or going outside. A pet door can be secured from unwanted individuals, but can also serve as an additional entryway for your loved ones.

#5 Myth: My Locking Cover Can be Opened From the Outside
Not true! To ease the thought of someone crawling through your door or wall, manual pet doors or non-electronic, have locking covers that can act as burglar barriers. A locking cover should be placed inside the home where there is controlled access. Locking covers are made specifically for their door, so there are a few different types out there. However, most are made of steel or a hard plastic. These security covers do not have tabs or small openings for anyone or anything to pry open from the outside. Many covers also have latches or pin locks to prevent them from being pushed outward. If there is a concern with your existing locking cover, check out the WatchDog Steel Security Pet Door Cover to ensure maximum security.

A Guide on Pet Door Training

Your pet is one step closer to freedom! Now, they just need the training to use their new door…Here are the do’s and do not’s for dog and cat door training!
With time and patience, you can definitely teach an old dog new tricks. Below, are some tips on making training a breeze. We also will include some common mistakes to avoid when using your pet door. Feel free to comment with any additional concerns and we would be glad to help!
Starting the Process

1. Consistency is key
This goes hand in hand with the saying “practice makes perfect.” Training your pet does take time, but this counts as practice for them. Sticking to the same methods and doors will give your pet a better chance of learning fast. If you plan on having different types of pet doors in the house, choose one to use during the training exercises.

2. Keep it cool, calm, and collected
Every pet learns differently, and in the event your pet needs some extra time with their door, stay patient. Trying to rush the process can confuse your pet, and stall the process. It is best to refrain from pushing or shoving your pet through the door. First, introduce them to the flap. You can push it open and close to show them how it works. Try to keep it open and encourage them to peer their head through so they know it is safe. If your pet is having trouble getting comfortable with their door, position yourself outside so they can come to you. Treats are also a great way to entice a walk through.

3. Set a time limit
It is a good idea to set a time limit for training. We recommend it be 10 minutes at a time. The harder time your pet has might indicate more training sessions throughout the week or day.

4. Make sure the Flap is the Correct Size
There might be nothing more awkward than getting stuck in somewhere you don’t fit. Before installing your item, make sure your pet will be able to fit through that opening. If they get stuck mid-way, they definitely cannot train to use it!

5. Adapt to the different Flaps
There are so many different model doors. Each door has their own flap that can be clear, heavily magnetized, or electronic. We have provided additional tips and tricks to get your pet comfortable with different flap types:

Clear Flaps: Your pet might confuse this with a window rather than a pet door. You can place a piece of masking tape on the flap to remind your pet they can go through it.
Magnetized flaps: Energy efficient flaps can come with side or bottom magnets, sometimes both. This can cause the flap to increase in weight, making it harder to push. If you can, remove a magnet to let your pet get the hang of it. Otherwise, help push it open the first few times.
Electronic Flaps: These openings tend to be made of a hard material that is not flexible. When activated by a chip or collar key, a clicking noise will unlock the flap. If this noise frightens your pet, it is best to positively reinforce the sound. You can encourage and praise your pet for going through despite the noise. You can also turn off the electronic device until they fully understand how to pass through.